Boston's Urban Forestry Coalition

Participating Organizations

  • Arnold Arboretum, Boston, MA
  • Boston Natural Areas Network, Boston, MA
  • City of Boston/Parks Department
  • Charles River Conservancy
  • Classic Communications
  • Dorchester Environmental Health Coalition
  • EarthWorks
  • Franklin Park Coalition
  • JP Trees
  • Urban Ecology Institute
  • USDA Forest Service
  • Charles River Watershep Association
  • Girls Get Connected Collaborative

Please note that all data below was derived from the collaboration's nomination for the Collaboration Prize. None of the submitted data were independently verified for accuracy.

Joint Programming to launch and manage one or more programs
City
Environment
2005
  • Serve more and/or different clients / audiences
  • Improve programmatic outcomes
  • Improve the quality of services / programs
Community leader(s) / organization(s)
>10
Yes
Coordinating agency, with one or more staff dedicated to the collaboration
  • Achieving shared vision
  • Internal and external communication
  • Coordination / integration of programs & services
  • Reaching agreement in marketing / branding
  • Defining and measuring success
  • Greater ability for each partner to focus on core competency - Greater ability to allocate resources to areas of need
  • Financial savings - Consolidation of management / administration
  • Financial savings - Coordination / consolidation of programming
  • Financial savings - Shared development function
  • Fund development - Successful capital campaign
  • Improved marketing and communications, public relations and outreach - Improved marketing and communications, public relations and outreach
  • Previously unmet community need now being addressed
  • Stronger / more effective "voice"
  • Greater coordination of services (less overlap, duplication, fragmentation)
  • Improved programmatic outcomes
  • Increased collaboration with / among other community organizations (beyond the scope of the original collaboration)
  • Collaboration has served as a model for others
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